Probate is the process wherein a decedent’s will is presented to the appropriate county office and the named executor is formally sworn in to handle their estate. Probate can also occur if a decedent passes without a will in which case their next of kin can apply to serve as the administrator of their estate. There are a number of steps to take and potential costs involved to complete administration of an estate once formally probated. Depending on the nature of assets and debts of the decedent, probate can sometimes be avoided. It is key to consult with an experienced estate attorney to see if this is possible.

A good estate plan can also eliminate the need for probate. An individual can make plans during their lifetime that may eliminate the need for any probate after their death. For example, they can funnel their assets into non-probate assets which include assets that have a beneficiary designation or payable on death designation. They may also consider titling assets with another individual as joint tenants with rights of survivorship. A trust may be a good fit such that assets are held in trust and not in the name of the individual, with instructions on how the trust should operate following the death of the person creating and funding the trust. Identifying a good estate plan is also very case specific and should be discussed with an experienced attorney as well as a financial planner and/or tax advisor.