Disclaimers and renunciations are forms that can impact the administration of an estate. As is true with all legal paperwork, the best policy is to consult with an attorney before signing. If you elect not to consult with an attorney, at least be aware of the purpose of each form. A renunciation is used where an individual who has been named as an executor declines to serve in that capacity. You may name the individual who should serve in your place unless a contingent executor as already been named. In the case of an individual passing without a will, the next of kin would be first in line to serve as administrator of the estate. This individual can also sign a renunciation to waive their right to serve and allow someone else to serve. If there are issues with the person who stands to serve and a refusal to voluntary renounce their position, any other individuals with an interest in the estate can still petition the court to address their concerns.

A disclaimer is used to waive your right to receive an inheritance. Being named as a beneficiary or being an heir at law does not mean that you have to accept what is designated to go to you. It is possible to decline to receive your inheritance. The result of a disclaimer is that you are treated as if you predeceased the decedent. A will or the laws of intestacy would dictate how your share would be distributed among other beneficiaries. A valid disclaimer must be in writing. It must adequately identify the decedent and the asset or amount being disclaimed. It is possible to do a full disclaimer or a partial disclaimer where you only refuse certain assets or a certain amount. The disclaimer has to be served on the person handling the estate, such as the executor or administrator, and/or filed with the court. A disclaimer is irrevocable so be sure of your decision prior to executing the document.  by April M. Townsend